“Where Was I?” I was here, on these dates: [ongoing]

SHORTCUTS TO PERIODS OF TIME / TOPICS ON THIS PAGE:

1965 1969 1971 1972 1973 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994

Since I’ve named my blog, “Where Were You?”, I thought it only natural to explain a bit of background, on how my love of music led to my free-lance concert photography.

On my “About” page, there is a brief description of my younger days, and some of the events that brought me to this point, in recounting and displaying images from the shows I attended.

Some early memories involve cartoons, of course, and other children’s programming, such as the following: Looney Tunes; Merry Melodies; Mighty Mouse; Deputy Dawg; Rocky & Bullwinkle, to start with – and an early favorite of mine, Diver Dan Diver Dan on Wikipedia .  Check out early episodes, here: Diver Dan – Episode 1 , all of which definitively shaped my mind at an early age.

But, let’s move on to the other pop culture phenomenon which would permanently alter my life……

I shall now wander a bit, back in time, and attempt to fill in a few gaps, by listing those shows, that I can remember, and a few words on those dates, just for the fun of it.

Since I never made an ongoing record of those dates, in a diary form, as such, I will have to jump back-and-forth, at times, when something jars my memory, and I can place the dates and locations.

From hearing The Beatles on the radios of my neighbors and relatives [my parents wouldn’t hear of it in our home], and the trove of copycats that sprung up immediately, along with the strange mix of Phil Spector hits and Detroit R&B thrown in, for good measure, I was constantly eager to hear more of these “energetic” sounds “out there”[spilling into our lives from the New York Metropolitan area].

Out there, because in our home, we mostly heard the pleasant sounds of what became known as muzak, along with a steady diet of performers that were appearing regularly on the variety television shows of the day [think:  The Ed Sullivan Show, or The Red Skelton Show, for starters].  Along with that, there was a healthy dose of Country & Western music played in our home, or as my father calls it, “Hillbilly Music”.  He refers to it as this, for at the time, living near New York City, few people were known to be avid fans of the form and he was – and is – a proud fan of the originals of the genre.

Now, having stated that “new artists” weren’t played in our home [my father rejected “the screaming” of the groups], my mother was a bit less strict about letting some form of these newly popular tunes into the apartment.  Saturdays was the time when television reigned supreme.  Once my favorite cartoons of the morning gave way to the “teen” portion of the programming, the opportunities to see and hear these curious new performers arose.

Luckily, there were programs like “Where the Action Is”, which I would sometimes get to see a few minutes of, on weekdays after school; “Shindig!” http://www.james-burton.net/shindig/ [which was on too late during the week… I would catch a few episodes years later, on rerun]  and “Hullaballoo” to help inform the pop music viewer, and I devoured these shows, whenever they would be allowed to air in the house, or while visiting friends and relatives.

But what set all of my interest rolling along, of course, was the famous appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, of The Beatles.

Normally, I was only allowed to watch the first few minutes of the program [mostly to see Topo Gigio https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topo_Gigio ], and then it was off to bed. But, in early 1964, the airwaves had been filled for weeks with Beatles’ songs, and then their debut on American television would be occur on February 9th.  I was eager to see the show, but alas, my father would have none of it.  Well, the ensuing week the hysteria just whipped up higher, and talk on the radio, in the newspapers, and amongst neighbors of their previous appearance could not be avoided, so I started pleading with my mother to allow me to see the following Sunday night’s appearance.  My father was dead-set against it, saying it was past my bedtime [filled with spite with all of the clamor over these screamers with long hair].

This petitioning would end up going on for the next two weeks, as the second appearance went by, and I had to go to bed, without seeing any of the show, with an assurance from my mother, that she would try to convince my father to allow me to see the next, and last, appearance.  In the end, my mother persevered, arguing that my father wouldn’t even be home from his work shift until half-way through the program, and since I generally behaved, and did well at school, she couldn’t see the harm in allowing me to see it [I often wondered if she secretly wanted to see what the fuss was all about, as well, as I’m sure she must have been at least “a little curious”, herself]. Needless to say, like countless others, I was mesmerized.  For me, it was George Harrison that would get most of my initial attention, as it was quite a sight for me to see this guy handling what seemed like such a large guitar, and then singing with the others, on top of it.  My loyalties would change a few times over the years, and my favorite band to follow, would also change, once The Beatles called it quits, but that appearance would change me a lot.

My fervor for their music would be stoked further, about a year later, when we moved again, and one of my new neighborhood friends would turn out to be an avid collector, of anything, and everything “Beatles”.  He was the lone child in the family, and his parents lavished him with almost anything he desired:  Beatles’ wind-up guitar; Beatles’ throw rug; Beatles’ bobble-head dolls; Beatles’ rubbish bin, even!  I would have to be content with the occasional package of Beatles’ gum cards, along with a healthy dose of “Combat!” television series’ cards http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combat! and Rat Fink plastic dolls and rings http://www.ratfink.com/that my uncles and aunts would give me, from time to time.  After all, I had siblings, and the parents couldn’t fill all of our wish lists, without upsetting the others……So, I made do with what I could collect, eventually getting all three series of Beatles’ cards complete!…..These few treasured possessions of mine were only to become lost [actually, left behind by my father – along with the Rat Finks and the rest] on the big move my family made, nearly halfway across the country, in 1967.  It would be years before my wondering aloud about those items, and the mysterious loss from the truck – when nothing else turned up missing – prompted an admission from my father, that he decided to leave the box of “junk” behind.  He still thinks I needed to get “over it” a long time ago, but I had a hunch that somehow there was more to the story than I had been getting for all those years.  Anyway, I have good memories that go along with those few years of the card collecting, and the fact that my uncles were hip enough to think I would get into the Rat Fink craze, even though I never became a “motorhead”…..

rat-fink-doll

Here, I think it is fitting to begin to list my concert attendances:

I will start my “concert attendance log”, officially, with this third appearance of The Beatles, on February 23, 1964, as it is the springboard for much of my main love in life: music.  Most of my life after this event would revolve around music, in some form or fashion, after this “magic moment”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ed_Sullivan_Show#The_Beatles

That evening, I was allowed to stay up late, and watch the whole program on our family’s black and white RCA Victor television set, in the comfort of our small living room [It looked a lot like the Wayland 21-K-33 model, found on this page: http://www.tvhistory.tv/1960-RCA-Ad4-BW.JPG ].

***

1965 or 1966

But, it would be the Summer of ’65, before I would actually see any bands perform live.  Actually, the first time I saw a band perform, was in a city park, somewhere in New Jersey, at a barbecue/picnic that my family attended.  Nearby, at the park’s bandstand https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandstand a local band was performing for a good part of the afternoon.  It would get my immediate attention, and I probably watched a good 45 minute set, before the parents got concerned and brought me back to the gathering – but not before the drummer handed me a broken drumstick during their break.  I have no idea who I saw, but that drumstick was another item that disappeared before long, from my small collection of toys & momentos [it was a danger to the other children, being sharp on one end, as the explanation went].

That same Summer, my neighbor with the room full of Beatles’ collectibles, and his parents invited me to go to Atlantic City for a weekend, where I would see my first bona-fide pop concert – and not just one, but two!

I cannot locate firm dates for these events, and it is remotely possible that they were on different dates, but I could almost swear that I saw these performers on the same day…

The afternoon venture into Atlantic City, and the Boardwalk, yielded the adventures of riding on the roller coaster set at the edge of the pier [scary to me, because for a brief moment, you edged over the platform and went out over the seawater]; seeing the Diving Horses [partly famed for the Timex Watches commercials http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=ZEkPQ6xDWMc ]; and taking a ride in the diving bell, which went down into the seawater a number a feet – you could almost see something in the lime-green glow of the water http://www.down-the-shore.com/steelpiertime.html

But that afternoon, or the next, we stopped by a ballroom on the Pier, and saw Louis Armstrong and his band, all dressed in white tuxes!  I immediately recognized who he was, once he and the band launched into “Hello Dolly!”, but aside from the time of day, and the tuxes, I don’t recall much more, other than a lot of people dressed for the occasion.  Really lucky, if unaware of the cultural import of the man, at the time.

After much research, I believe I narrowed it down to the summer of 1965, as evidenced by these ads for Louis Armstrong, and Gary Lewis & the Playboys, both playing the same week, and in the same venue….

philadelphia_daily_news_fri-7-9-65-louis_gary

Further clues were found, when I discovered ads for popular movies that also played that summer, and which we saw during that holiday stretch, as well [“What’s New Pussycat?”], as well as another performance by Gary Lewis & the Playboys, at about the same point in time:

the_philadelphia_inquirer_fri-7-2-65-louis_gary_pussycat

Later that evening, we would attend a performance by Gary Lewis & The Playboys, of “This Diamond Ring” fame http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Diamond_Ring, amongst others.  This would be my first-hand witnessing of the hysterical girls screaming, during and after the songs [although not as much as The Beatles would prompt], and even the after-show ritual of the girls chasing the limos the band were shuttled in, from the backstage area.  All good fun.  I cannot admit to their having a lasting impact on my listening tastes, but it was definitely memorable.

It would seem that some other young woman enjoyed a similar experience that summer, judging from her remembrances of that summer [“The Happiest Single Day of My Vacation”, written by Jane Mouton, from ‘The Junior Reporter Club’:

day-at-the-pier-complete-the_bristol_daily_courier_8-28-65

A close-up view of the article [I wouldn’t say that it was my single happiest day of the summer, but it ranked up there, for sure!]:

the_bristol_daily_courier_sat-8-28-65-happiest-day

Too bad it wasn’t the following summer, under the same circumstances, or I might’ve lucked into seeing this show, instead:

philadelphia_daily_news_thu-6-30-66-stones_steel_pier

To add one more memory from this trip, it cannot go without saying that I also attended a screening of the film, “What’s New Pussycat?” [as mentioned above] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What%27s_New_Pussycat%3F, with “The Train” as the opener http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Train_%281964_film%29

……eye-opening stuff for a kid who hadn’t reached ten years of age yet – and on many levels!

Some interesting reads that I came across, from the period, and on the rock “phenomenon” of the day:

pittsburgh_post_gazette_mon-5-24-65-millions

And another, longer version of the same article, with a bit more to digest, to boot, such as the Hawaiian dancer ad, or the Sonny Liston vs. Cassius Clay closed-circuit television ad [before he became Muhammed Ali]. Mentions of numerous bands of the British Invasion; a tie-in ad for the movie with up-and-coming rock bands; as well as typo-errors for The Beatles, Merseybeat, et cetera, are also abundant :

asbury_park_press_sun-5-2-65-millions_2

This would be the sum total of my “live” music experiences, until after the big move, in 1967, where, other than a few local “battle of the bands” shows at the local high school, and the private garage parties of my teen years, I wouldn’t see another big show until a “Toy for Tots” extravaganza – most likely in 1968 – since my family hadn’t purchased a permanent home until then. And, I hadn’t yet become friends with the two classmates with whom music was a central part of our lives…… It was with Gary and Greg, that most adventures related to music and concerts would be shared with, for many years to come.

***

1969

After the relocation of the family to my father’s hometown, it would be a while before getting “settled”.  It also took a while to make some lasting friendships, and as luck would have it, I met another kid, who had been born in New Jersey, as well.  We hit it off, for that reason alone, but we would both find that our mutual interests in music, ran deeper than most people we knew.  There was a third friend, on whom we would eventually rely on for our rides to many future shows, who also had a keen interest in music [and the larger record collection, stereo, guitar, etc….].

As the holidays approached, the annual “Toys for Tots” benefit concert would roll into town, with its ‘package tour’ cast of artists.  Standard entrance to the show required a new toy, that would be donated for those who were less well-off, and in return, the audience would be treated to roughly 20 minutes of music by popular acts of the day, and new talents, on the rise.  We put out feelers with our mutual friend, whose mother was very considerate in driving us to, and from, the show, and the next thing we knew, we were on our way to a “pop concert”.

Reports from the ’67 show:

toys-for-tots-report-12-8-67

toys-for-tots-page-1-report-12-11-67

toys-for-tots-page-2-report-12-11-67

Reports from the ’68 show:

toys-for-tots-report-12-16-68

toys-for-tots-12-16-68-snapshot

This year’s benefit show would perhaps feature The Box Tops [I am almost certain, although they are not mentioned at this link, but my brain cells could be playing tricks on me…. http://www.1080wklo.com/toysfortots.htm ], The Spiral Staircase, and The Lemon Pipers, amongst others. Another link with more on the “Toys for Tots” shows is found here: WKLO AM Radio link to Toys for Tots info . Our seats were way back in the nosebleed section, but it was okay, because it was the first time to be at such a large venue, and getting to see a lot of bands in one go [see the previous link for more on those bands, and more].  This took place at Freedom Hall, which would host many of the largest bands passing through the region, over the years, and I would take quite a few of my later concert photos here, including Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, and ZZ Top, just to name a few.

***

1971

Alice Cooper w/Buster Brown opening 

@ Brown Theater

Louisville, Kentucky

[September 18th, 1971] featuring 2 shows, at 8:00 & 10:30 pm!

 concert-ad-alice-cooper-at-brown-theatre-9-18-71

This was the year that I consider the first “real” rock concert took place, that I attended, with my other two buddies [Gary and Greg], whose combined record collection had grown considerably, and whose musical tastes had become less “catholic”, thanks to the advent of “Underground FM Radio”, as we called it then http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_rock_%28radio_format%29.

All of us had been exposed to quite a few of the British bands that were beginning to make waves in the States, but we were all quite fixated with The Alice Cooper Band, by this time, and they rolled into town for a two-show appearance – a matinee and late show http://www.alicecooperechive.com/tourdates/index.php?date=love .  This format was ideal for us to convince our parents to allow us to attend, since we could be home for a “normal” bedtime, as school was just about to start, or had just started.  This show, to the best of my recollection, took place during the last week of August, or first week of September, as I was just about to turn thirteen.  These shows took place at the Brown Theater http://www.kentuckycenter.org/aboutus/browntheatre .

As I remember it, we had purchased tickets for the early show, at about $ 3.50, and they were very nicely done, as almost a postcard-sized ticket. Our seats were in the balcony, about 2 rows back from the edge, with a perfect sight line to the stage, and almost dead-center for sound.  I had stressed out about what to wear to my first concert, and in the end chose a pull-over sweater and jeans, and as I was walking down the steps to find the row where my seat was, I was pinched on the ass by someone, who probably mistook me for a girl, with my now longer hairstyle.  Quite a surprise, to say the least, but it was soon forgotten, when the house lights went down, and the opening act took the stage.

Buster Brown

Buster Brown [band] would soon command the stage, and they were much louder than I had expected. They were fairly active, moving about on stage, but the most interesting item from their set, was a heavy version of The Beatles’ “Across the Universe” [if memory serves].  The house lights went back up at the conclusion of the set, and I had my first look around at the crowd.  A sweet smell was wafting about by this point in time, and nearly everyone was smiling from ear-to-ear [like me], or deep into conversation with those nearby.  I knew not what that smell was related to, just yet, in my young years.

A short time later, the house lights went down again, and to a rousing number of cheers from the front rows, the Alice Cooper Band took to the stage.  I had no idea what to expect, other than what few photos we had seen in Creem magazine https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creem , or Circus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circus_%28magazine%29  [our main source of printed material on musicians, other than Rolling Stone Magazine], but I knew every note of the “Love It to Death” album by heart, and since it was their latest album, I knew I’d hear at least a few of those tunes….

Little did I know that the band would perform only songs from the latest album, and nothing more!  But, no matter, as I was as happy as I could be, watching and listening to what transpired on that evening.  The sound was great; the visuals were perfect from where I was sitting; and the sold out crowd was really into it [I forgot to mention how many times people offered to buy our tickets as we made our way in….one guy even offered 20 bucks!!!].  The spectacle of Alice, dressed mainly in ripped black leotards, and leather harness vest and crotch-heavy shorts, along with the longest hair I’d ever seen sported by men before, on the drummer, Neal Smith, and bassist, Dennis Dunaway, was initially arresting – but the smile just stayed plastered on my face, as the guitars kicked in; and the double-kick drums, which I had never seen used before, thumped along to the uptempo songs that started the show.

Alice roamed back and forth, taunting the audience at the front, and the audience was eating it up.  Although the later tours would become more and more lavish with props and lighting, this was very basic in comparison:  simple spotlights kept on Alice for most of the show, with a mild addition of clothing for certain songs [ “The Ballad of Dwight Fry” would feature a white straightjacket, and a simple, two-by-four assembled ‘electric chair, with a tin-foil covered bowl lowered onto his head for the execution, for example].  At another point in the show, Alice left the stage and returned with a rapier, fencing sword, which had numerous bills speared on it.  He would wave the sword above the heads of those in the front row or two, and with each broad swipe, a number of the bills would fly off the end.  It turned out later, that these were “Alice Dollars”, if I am not mistaken; surely a collector’s item these days, even with the holes and tears in them!

Musically, the dueling lead guitars of Glen Buxton and Michael Bruce, and sound of the band was everything I had hoped for.  The slower numbers worked just as well as the fast ones, and with Alice banging a mike stand or hammer on the stage [I cannot remember exactly], to count out the rhythm to the closer, “Sun Arise”, the show came to a rousing conclusion.  The slow-burning hit, “I’m Eighteen” had been performed earlier in the set, and once the band left stage, it was only a short minute or two before the house lights went up, and the announcement that the audience now needed to clear the house for the late show, was broadcast through the P.A.

I waited for many of the others in the balcony to leave first, then made my way to meet my friends, who had other seat locations, to make our way out, but, one of us needed to use the restroom badly, so we made our way there, only to be stopped by an usher who said we had to leave immediately.  When the one who needed to pee urgently protested, he took one look at the three of us, and then said, “Hurry it up, and then go!”, and proceeded to concern himself with some other stragglers.  Well, about 10 minutes must have passed while our friend took his turn and we quietly compared notes on the show, and then it was time to leave, but, our third friend decided he was going to wait there for the ushers to let in the next group of attendees for the late show, and take his chances on seeing the second show, as well.  Not being the brave one, and relying on a ride home, which was no short distance away, I decided it was time to leave for the car.

The great thing about that break between shows was, as we were leaving, the ushers had already let in people for the late show, so they stopped us before we walked out the door, and handed us a couple of different-looking flyers with custom artwork for the show, telling us, “When you come back, you can get back in with these”.  We both kept going, looking at the papers and wondering what that was all about, when suddenly several people came running up to us and started offering 10 bucks for the papers we were holding.  This was confusing, but since they were getting urgent about it, and we both could only muster a “Really???”. It was when they put the money out for us to take that ……well ….. what else could we do, but hand them over, and take the money??! Wonder what those would be worth now? Back to the car, and to the question, “Did you enjoy the show?” Well, you can image the response to that question!

What a way to finish the evening:  Seeing a great concert, and then making the cost of the original ticket back, plus a few dollars profit!!  And memories to last a lifetime, to boot!  Many more shows over the next eleven years would be tallied, after this one, before I would move again, and continue this ritual:  seeing a band/performer, under the best possible conditions, in the hopes of a gratifying evening spent for my time.  The photography element would not enter the equation for another few years, and that would add an even greater personal challenge for myself – documenting the show, as best I could, given the circumstances.

alice-cooper-louisville-live-review-9-19-71

This would be the only time I would see Alice Cooper live, even though it would be a few albums more, at the point that the original lineup would start to depart, before my interest moved on to many other genres and performers, but I still listen to this album, and the next one, “Killer”, when I need a kick-start to my day, from time-to-time. “Love It to Death”, for sure!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_It_to_Death

A side-note…. if only I had been older, and could drive farther north, at the time, check out this bill at about the same period in time [1971]!

ad-sabbath-cooper-pie-7-25-71

NOTE:  Speaking of our record collections, Greg had already gotten the original pressing with the Straight Records label, and that would also be the original, uncensored cover.  My copy, which was acquired a few months later, would be on the green Warners label, with the Straight Records imprint on it.  My cover had been altered only by the addition of the small white rectangle with the ‘Includes the hit, “I’m Eighteen” on it.  My parents were even cool enough to get me the original “Killer” lp, with the gatefold calendar/poster sleeve for Christmas, later that year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_%28Alice_Cooper_album%29

Michael Conen -  MC searching for identity circa '73

Me, playing around with “an image” of myself, while seeing what the camera could do with the available light in my basement room

 

Michael Conen - Flyers on bedroom wall circa '72

That would be me, above, dreaming of getting into some of the shows from the flyers on my wall….too young – you had to be 21 to get into the bars – so I had to be content with some of the bigger shows when it wasn’t a school night

***

1972

Yes w/ The Eagles opening

@ Louisville Commonwealth Convention Center

Louisville, Kentucky

[August 18, 1972]

concert-ad-yes-the-eagles-at-convention-center-8-18-72

Another major show to have caught a break on:  it was still summer vacation from school, so no worries about attending this one!  Yes, along with Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, and Genesis, were major faves at this time; “Close to the Edge” had just started to get airplay, because it hadn’t been released yet, and having had practically worn out the grooves on “Fragile” already, I was primed and eager to see this show.  My buddy Gary had already seen them on their previous tour, so, along with Greg, we were dead set on attending this one.  I had a decent seat, in the lower concourse area, to the left side of the stage, about mid-court [the hall was also used for a time to host the local ABA basketball team, The Kentucky Colonels http://www.remembertheaba.com/kentucky-colonels.html#, which I had the pleasure of attending many times over the years – look for the link to “Interior” from 1967 through 1970 for a picture of the hall].

My brain is fuzzy about who the opening act was, but I’m fairly sure it was Lindisfarne, who received a polite applause from the audience during their set in response to their mainly acoustic set, with a lot of classical and folk touches, and this kept the mood mellow as we awaited the arrival of Yes. NOTE: After recent archival research was done, I discovered that it was the Eagles who opened! While I must have been interested in their set at the time, I had completely forgotten this, over the years….

I was very eager to see and hear Bill Bruford, on drums, but was somewhat confused when the band took the stage, because the drummer looked nothing like the photos from the lp sleeves:  Bruford had curly brownish hair, and this guy had longer, straight blonde hair?  That thought had to be filed away as the show started, because the music immediately arrested my attention [along with the vast majority of those in attendance].  Since the lp, in its entirety, had not yet reached the stores, a lot of what was performed on that evening was “new” – in the strictest sense of the word – and that lent a very magical air to the experience. The sound mix was clear as a bell, and nearly every nuance in their music could be better appreciated, as a result.

This show would make me a confirmed Yes-fan, for a number of years to follow.  I did not miss a tour that passed through Louisville, for the next 6 years or so!  I would even see them perform without Jon Anderson, many years later, when the main members of The Buggles took over the lead vocal and keyboard duties – but the less said about that, the better…..

Needless to say, the show was practically flawless in execution, and the new songs were quite impressive, in their complexity and beauty [already having been a “progressive rock” fan, amongst the many styles of music I enjoyed listening to, at that point in time].  Being able to enjoy the quietest passages, along with the most thunderous sections of the music, thanks to the great sound mix, made for a great memory.  As a side note:  This would be the only show I saw with the band that did not feature any elaborate stage props.  Just a simple light show, relatively speaking, and that probably had a lot to do with why the music was so impressive – there were no other distractions on display that could lessen the impact of the music [except perhaps, Rick Wakeman’s outfit]. Aside from that nagging question about the drummer’s identity, the only other “disappointment” would be my hoping beyond hope for the band to perform their version of  Simon & Garfunkel’s “America” – a wish that would go unfulfilled throughout the many tours I saw in the succeeding years.  No matter – this show was another in a string of stellar experiences in my early years of concert-going, and has remained a fine memory of the days when a reserved seat was the ideal seating arrangement for such a performance.

A few weeks later, after the lp was released, and the press had begun to write of the tour underway in the States, it became clear that we had seen the new drummer Alan White, who fit in, seamlessly, with the band, for that tour, and many, many more to come.  I would not get to see Bill Bruford perform live, until seeing him with King Crimson, on the “Three of a Perfect Pair” Tour, many years later – which was another stunning performance [more on that, later…].

Black Sabbath w/ Gentle Giant opening

@ Louisville Gardens  

Louisville, Kentucky

[Originally slated for August 27th, and finally determined for the first week of September, 1972]  *This performance date had been delayed several times due to illness complaints with Ozzy & the band.. as detailed in these clippings below:

Check out their being slated for the last night’s concert of the State Fair that year…and the parade of stars who also took part that week:

black-sabbath-louisville-festival-advertisement-8-13-72

All seemed well, at first:

concert-ad-black-sabbath-at-freedom-hall-original-date-8-26-72

Well, the initial anticipation was suddenly delayed, as a result of the first announced cancellation [also note one of the many times, Ozzy’s name would be mis-spelled over the years] ….

black-sabbath-louisville-show-rescheduled-8-27-72

So, plans to attend a “regular” concert night were thus made, only to be met with another announcement [again with a proof-reader glancing over the spelling of Ozzy’s name]:

black-sabbath-louisville-show-rescheduled-again-8-30-72

In the meantime, a report would come out, about the logistics of the Kentucky State Fair shows, and how well [or not] things panned out.  Black Sabbath gets a mention, regarding the post-poned performance:

black-sabbath-louisville-festival-report-8-28-72

Finally, the long-awaited show happens, on September 6, 1972:

concert-ad-black-sabbath-at-freedom-hall-final-date-scheduled-8-31-72

Another “heavy” band that my friends and I had been listening to, since the release of their first album, was Black Sabbath.  This show had been anticipated for a long time, and once again, Greg’s mother was cool about driving us there, and picking us up, afterward, but on the condition that we had to be at a certain location, where she would be waiting, at no later than 11:00 pm.  This would affect our seeing the entire set, because there was a very lengthy delay before the concert could start.  Luckily, the show was the week before school started, so it did not present the usual problem of having to try to persuade the parents into making an exception, on a school night!

This show would be a turning point in my musical horizons, because of the opening band, Gentle Giant, and their mightily impressive performance.  I had become slightly familiar with their music, thanks to the local “underground FM station”, which had been playing a few tracks from their latest lp, “Three Friends”, and a few songs from some earlier releases too – but none of that would prepare me for their live performance on that evening.  In retrospect, it was a very odd pairing, musically, but I suppose it was following the spirit of the billings that were taking place at places like The Fillmore East, in NYC, where all sorts of musical genres would be mixed on the same evening’s bill.  However, in Louisville, that normally did not go down well with the local concert-goers, who were usually happier with bands that “rocked” on the same bill, or bands who tended to have a similar approach, stylistically, let’s say.

Anyway, some details about the evening:  first of all, I am not absolutely sure that this show was even at Louisville Gardens, as I seem to remember it actually taking place at the larger Freedom Hall [edited 9-30-16:  now confirmed, as a result of researching the local newspaper], because of the strange arrangements with our “ride” after the show, and how we had to make it back to a specific place, so the traffic jam of people coming out could be avoided [and it was avoided, as we were quickly on our way, once back in the car….but that is getting ahead of the story a bit].

Gentle Giant took the stage, more or less on time, but before they did, there was ample time to survey the stage, and being baffled at the number of instruments that were placed at different points around the performance area:  vibes; keyboards of a number of types; saxophones on stands; and of course the drums and electric instruments one became accustomed to expecting to be used at rock shows.  But, before their set was over, they would use all of these instruments, and more, that were not on display before the set began, like a violin and recorder, or piccolo.  And perform them, they did!  The intricacy of the arrangements; the very energetic lead singer [Derek Shulman]; the guitar player [Gary Green] who would do a sort of “two step” back-and-forth as he played; the drummer [probably John Weathers, who’d only recently joined the band] who would leap from behind the kit to come out and play a bit on the vibes; and the larger, bearded member who would pace a bit [probably Phil Shulman], from side to side of the stage, picking up this instrument and that instrument [usually of the reed or woodwind variety], and play them all with equal ability! It was visually interesting, as well as musically satisfying -to these ears – and, amazingly, they did not test the patience of the audience.  They received a polite response, and when it was all over, I had decided that I had to track down more of their catalogue, and dig deeper into their output [keep in mind, we were also big fans of Jethro Tull, Yes, King Crimson and ELP, so it wasn’t that much of a stretch to be impressed by them – but indeed I was].  After getting a couple of their albums, it was suddenly clear that there were three brothers amongst the group, and the tally of instruments utilized by the band, was even greater!  Needless to say, they remain a band that I still listen to, with some regularity, along with three out of the four, previously mentioned above – guess which group hasn’t aged so well on repeated listening???

Now, there was a lengthy break between bands, which, although, understandably, the roadies had to tear down a lot of equipment to begin with, the process of watching them set up Black Sabbath’s equipment started to drag on, and on…… Curiously, instead of a bank of matching amplifiers, such as a wall of Marshall’s, for example, we were left to watch all manner of guitar amps being stacked up, this way, and that.

Rumors started to spread that the band wasn’t going to play, and a murmur started to grow, and after a bit of this, we were finally told that there were some ‘technical problems’ with their gear, and it was being sorted out.  Later, we would come to find out that the band’s own equipment [aside from their own personal gear] was stuck somewhere on the road, so calls were made to every known music equipment sales’ shops in the greater Louisville/Kentuckiana area, to gather enough ‘ampage’ for the band to use!

If I remember correctly, Gentle Giant started just after 8:00 PM, and played about an hour, and Black Sabbath didn’t hit the stage until close to 10:30 – and we were supposed to meet at the car at around 11 PM!!!!  The band finally hit the stage to a big roar of approval, and indeed, the ‘ampage’ was enough to power a loud sound throughout the hall.  The sight of Geezer Butler with his huge mane of hair shaking his head back-and-forth as he played, is still a very vivid memory for me.  There wasn’t much of a light show, as they basically played with the house lights about half-up, or down, as you like – but it didn’t matter:  every number they performed on the evening was already part of my grey matter from numerous plays of the lps before that day, and they just overwhelmed with their sound!  Much of the material was from their latest, “Volume Four”, but there was a healthy dose of earlier songs to be happy with hearing, too ….

Now, the problem became that Greg and I had to keep an eye on the time, and as it got closer to 11 PM, we had a brief discussion and then agreed that we would have to leave, no later than 11:15, so his mother wouldn’t get angry, and we’d blow our next chance for a ride to another concert we wanted to attend [since we weren’t old enough to drive yet, and public transit stopped nowhere near where we lived, at the time – amongst other complications for young teens, at the time!]…. And so, after about a 45 minute ‘taste’ of the show, we had to make our exit, and once outside, as we walked back to the car, we could hear the sound of “Iron Man” being played – it was disappointing we could not see the whole show, but the evening was thoroughly enjoyable, otherwise!

I would go on to see Gentle Giant open for other bands at shows in town, several more times [including another fantastic show, just a few months later in the year], but I would not see the Ozzy Osbourne version of Sabbath, again.  Several years later, I would see the Ronnie James Dio line-up perform – but actually, I was there to see another band on the bill [more on that show, another time].

The review of the show, in the papers, the following day:

black-sabbath-louisville-live-review-9-7-72

The reviewer mentions that quite a few people left early….. he probably neglected to notice that some of us may have had to leave, for the simple reason that a few spectators may had to endure a “parental curfew” in place, at the time, ha ha!

Interesting to note the size of the crowd [about 5,000], because it took place at Freedom Hall, which could hold about 18,000 spectators.  The hall had been arranged so that a smaller stage area was set up on one long side of the basketball floor, with folding chairs set up facing the stage, on the same floor, which then met the usual first area of reserved seats just above the floor. This was most definitely an unusual arrangement, as very few shows that did not nearly reach capacity, were held there, over the years that I attended concerts there.

Also note that Gentle Giant rates one sentence in the review….

The Official Gentle Giant homepage:

http://www.blazemonger.com/GG/Gentle_Giant_Home_Page

Another great resource on Gentle Giant live dates:

http://www.ggtourhistory.50webs.com/

***

It’s a Beautiful Day w/Manna opening

@ Louisville Memorial Auditorium

Louisville, Kentucky

[December 1st, 1972]

concert-ad-its-a-beautiful-day-at-memorial-auditorium-12-1-72

This would be the first time I attended a show at the beautiful Memorial Auditorium Memorial Audtiorium fact page, and I immediately fell in love with the venue, for three basic reasons:  it was much smaller than the “tin cans” I had seen shows in, up to now; it was acoustically sound, oritginally having been built to house the local symphony orchestra; and, it always had theatre seats – so no matter where you sat in the place, you had very good sight-lines to what was happening on stage, and the sound was always satisfying, no matter the performance.

This show was the first time I could definitively say, was made up mostly of the hippie element in the area.  That wasn’t a bad thing, since it was a mellow gathering of people who were there to enjoy the evening’s performance, in a traditional concert setting, which was just fine for me.

Local “underground” FM stations had been playing the headliner’s now-signature song, “White Bird”, for some months, and I was eager to see a show that was not going to require massive banks of amplifiers to get the music across [or at least, that is what I was expecting to experience].  If I remember correctly, I was about halfway back on the floor, seated to one side, and the sights and sounds were precisely what I had in mind, and enjoyed the performance quite a lot.  The experience was so good, that it had me keeping a keen eye out for any/all shows that would be booked there, in the future. Of the numerous acts that I would see there, over the years, there could be no complaints of anything other than the performers themselves, having an “off” night, as the auditorium, itself, never let me down, personally-speaking.  At some point, I will locate the review, pictured below, of this performance by It’s a Beautiful Day.

Michael Conen - Flyers on bedroom wall circa '72 closeup

A closeup of the flyers that were on one wall….note the review of an It’s a Beautiful Day show, that I attended [but cannot get a firm date for – these clippings are long gone now]. Saw Humble Pie a few times, and they were always great! Also pictured is the ad for Jethro Tull, on tour for “Thick As a Brick”, with Gentle Giant opening – which was another magical evening I was lucky enough to experience

Michael Conen - Flyers circa '72 closeup

Another set of clippings and ads for local shows – including a review of the first-ever “festival seating” show in town: Johnny Winter and Foghat…..great bill, but unpleasant experience for a short teenager, who could not look over the heads of the taller people ahead of me. The Jethro Tull show was another great one, this time for “A Passion Play”. Great seats, and great performance! One of the ones that ‘got away’: Quicksilver Messenger Service, with Wishbone Ash and Vinegar Joe [featuring a young Robert Palmer], was cancelled, due to weak ticket sales

Humble Pie w/ Edgar Winter Group

& Tranquility opening

@ Louisville Convention Center

Louisville, Kentucky

[December 13, 1972]

concert-ad-humble-pie-edgar-winter-tranquility-at-convention-center-12-13-72

This was another show that I had looked forward to seeing for some time, because my buddies and I had been listening repeatedly to the “Rock On”, and “Performance: Rockin’ the Fillmore” albums, for at least a year previous to this concert date, and the latest long-player “Smokin'” had just come out – and the grooves were nearly worn out on that one before long, too.  I missed my opportunity to see them on their previous tour, with Frampton in the line-up [hoping to catch them at that musical high-water mark in their career] because it was a school night, but Gary managed to see that one, as well as many more that I would have to “sit out”, due to my parents’ restrictions regarding ‘studies vs. rock concerts’, and which of the two had the greater priority.

This bill would feature a fairly folksy group that opened the night’s proceedings, with a band called Tranquility Tranquility review/info . I was already quite into other groups, like Fairport Convention, The Incredible String Band, and Pentangle, along with performers like Joni Mitchell and Nick Drake, so their particular approach actually appealed enough to get me to track down their album after the show, and purchase it.  I think I held on the that lp for about 4 years, before trading it in for something else, that I would listen to more often. In retrospect, they were an odd pairing with the two bands that followed, but it was still a pleasing way to start the evening.  They must have played for about 40 minutes: just enough time to keep the crowd from getting impatient, waiting for the second act to make their entrance.

The Edgar Winter Group had just released an album with a song that was getting a lot of local airplay – “Frankenstein” – and they already had a bit of a following in the area, due to the earlier White Trash releases, so they were given an enthusiastic welcome that night.   I was a much bigger fan of his brother, Johnny Winter, whom I would see a few times, since I was less interested in a synthesizer as a lead instrument, and Johnny was already a master guitarist. The line-up featured a couple of guys who would go on to create their own successes, later, with Ronnie Montrose and Dan Hartman, and while the set was a rockin’ affair, it was not really all that enjoyable for me.  I never bought any material by any of these guys [excepting Johnny Winter], as they were unavoidable on the FM airwaves for a few years, and that was more than enough for me, as a listening experience.  You may have noticed, in the photos of the concert ads, that the band would be headlining soon enough, but I would not attend that show, since the opening acts were not strong enough to bother with – having already seen them on this occasion.

Well, I was already chomping at the bit, by the time Humble Pie finally hit the stage, but any impatience I might have felt was almost instantly washed away, by the time they finished their first number for the evening.  The line-up had, by this time, added Clem Clempson on guitar, an ex-member of Colisseum [whose music my buddy Gary had already introduced us to].  My lingering doubts about whether the band would be as good without Frampton were also pushed aside, in no short order.  Steve Marriott, by far, would be the most ‘colorful’ user of the English language from a performer, that I would ever see, live, and was thoroughly entertaining about it, too.  The evening’s set would balance quite a few numbers from the double-live lp, along with a healthy dose of the latest release, and they rocked [and rolled], with an assurance that never disappointed these ears and eyes.  I would see them a couple of times during this period of time, simply because they were so good, that it didn’t matter who opened for them.  They were one of the few bands I ever saw, who truly “rocked and rolled” in the truest sense of the phrase.  From slow blues, to all out, full-throttle rock, they were masterful.  The band’s sound was also such that you could key in on any one of the musicians, and not get lost in a “din of noise” that often would mar many other live shows I would see, over the years.  I put that down to a combination of the band knowing exactly how to make their “sound” work, and the sound crew knowing what they were doing.  They would leave the crowd begging for more, even after a couple of lengthy encores, and in spite of the reserved seats on the floor, no one was bothered by the huge number of people who had gathered closer to the stage, in order to get closer and enjoy the show more.  These days hold fond memories for me, because at that at that time, you still had seating for all shows, and most people were civilized about the crowding to the stage during the latter portion of the performance, when everyone who remained would be enjoying themselves, and not too concerned with this “ritual”.  You had your clear sight-lines from your seat, and if you really wanted to be down front, most people were cool about it.  This would all change, the following year, and not all for the better, if you were to ask me, when the “festival seating” concept would be introduced.  More on that, when I recount the details from that show, which coincidentally, featured Johnny Winter as the headliner.

To this day, I still often play tracks from the double-live lp, and “Smokin'”, along with a few numbers from the next release, “Eat It!”, with the excellent “Black Coffee”, and those rockin’ live tracks, on the second lp.  Tis a shame Mr. Marriott would perish in the manner he did, but he sure left a lot of people with good, lasting memories of his work with The Small Faces, and Humble Pie “Rock On!”, indeed.

Humble Pie Tour Archives link:

http://home.comcast.net/~gv0000/Humble_Pie_Tour_Archive.html

It should behoove you to check out this documentary on the late, and most definitely “great” STEVE MARRIOTT:

http://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_life_and_times_of_steve_marriott_documentary_on_small_faces_and_humble

 ***

1973

This would be a busy year for this concert-goer, as it became easier to convince the parents I could manage my studies and still attend the shows, without it interfering…..but there would still be some major performances I would miss due to this “rule”.  However, there were a lot of very memorable shows that passed through town, and I caught:

Two such shows from ’73 – one I would attend, whilst the other, I believe was cancelled, due to low ticket sales, but featuring a group that I would have to wait a few years to see, Wishbone Ash:

ad-johnny-winter-foghat-wishbone-ash-4-15-73

Some shows, I no longer have the ticket stubs to, or access to my scrapbook [in storage] for reference, so Internet searches will help pin down the dates – most of the time.  A couple of headliners that I saw, but cannot find solid information for, were the following [that to the best of my recollection, occurred in 1973]:

Emerson, Lake & Palmer

 w/ Stray Dog

@ Louisville Commonwealth Convention Center

Louisville, Kentucky

[November 21st, 1973]

ad-emerson-lake-palmer-11-21-73

***

1974

New Rhythm and Blues Quartet [aka NRBQ]

@ The Red Barn, University of Louisville

Louisville, Kentucky

[February, 1974]

***

1976

 ***

The Gram Parsons Memorial Country-Rock Festival [various artists]

@ Memorial Coliseum, University of Kentucky

Lexington, Kentucky

[July 2nd & 3rd, 1976]

ad-gram-parsons-memorial-6-27-76

This was a monumental attempt at bringing together a great variety of artists, over a 2 day period, which would spotlight [in retrospect], that oft-quoted idea of Mr. Parsons’, of what he meant by “cosmic soul music”, I suppose….

The original reason for this festival coming about, is explained in this short article, concerning a mining accident and the attempts to help the victims’ families:

gram-parsons-fest-article-6-19-76

The promoters were rather idealistic, from all reports, and while they were rather tasteful in their selection of the artists that were originally billed to appear [and actually secured commitments from], they were not so deft at promotion, it would seem.  A glaring lack of ticket sales, and short supply of cash led to some major artists canceling their appearances – at the last possible moment, in certain cases.  In the promoters’ defense: the idea for, and execution of, the event, came about, in a very, very short amount of time. My fellow students had only heard or read about the show coming to town, less than a month before its actual date.

Over the course of a few weeks, the bill for Friday evening, July 2nd, would change from:

Chuck Berry [headlining]; The Chris Hillman Band; preceded by Firefall; and Roy Buchanan opening….

and a week later, the bill had been changed to:

The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band [headlining]; Chuck Berry; and Firefall [opening].

The slots for the early show on Saturday afternoon, July 3rd never changed, according to newspaper ads of the time:

Emmylou Harris and the Hot Band [headlining]; The Flying Burrito Brothers preceding; and Tompall [Glaser] & His Outlaw Band [opening].

The Saturday evening’s offering went from:

The Band [headlining]; Ray Charles [preceding]; and George Graves [opening]….

To:

The Band [headlining]; Ray Charles, The Raelettes & His Orchestra [preceding]; Roger McGuinn; and George Graves [opening].

These changes did not matter much to my friends and I [college students at the time].  What mattered most was the fact that each “show” had a separate fee to gain admission [and not a bulk price for the whole weekend, at least that I can recall], and it was going to cost a lot to see all three shows….

For me, it came down to which Saturday set was I most willing to shell out the money for?  To see Emmylou Harris and the Hot Band headlining? Or, The Band, with the added attraction of seeing the legendary Ray Charles?!?!

Being the most skint of my circle of friends, I decided that I’d go for the evening show, and also plunked down what little I had left, for a commemorative T-shirt of the whole festival [which was later stolen by an ex-girlfriend, much to my chagrin].

Well, as it turned out, upon entering the grounds to the Memorial Coliseum, you could see & sense that things were not going all that well, since there were very few people milling about, and once we entered the hall itself, we were greeted by the sight of stacks and stacks of instrument cases piled up in the open areas where you’d normally find concession stands, all bearing the stenciled words “Ray Charles Orch“, or “RCO“… if memory serves.

After asking a few questions of the few hangers-on we encountered, it transpired that there had been problems the night before; more problems earlier in the day; and now, it appeared that Mr. Charles was unhappy that he was not being given the agreed-upon advance to pay for the services of the artist and his singers, along with the orchestra.  There would be no performance, unless the guarantee was paid.

That is how it played out; and so, my friends and I, who had secured 4th row seats, were somewhat bummed out that we would not get to see Mr. Ray Charles, but in the end, we witnessed a great evening of music, anyway!

I cannot recall ever seeing this mysterious Mr. George Graves, but I most certainly remember seeing Thunderbyrd, with Roger McGuinn, playing his most recent compositions, as well as a healthy sprinkling of Byrds’ tunes thrown in for good measure.

As it turned out, we were witnessing the farewell tour of The Band, and I consider myself damn lucky to have seen them when I did.  Their set burned, from start to finish, and in retrospect, it is easy to understand why, but, on that night, it was one of those rare occasions when you knew, deep-down-inside, that you were in the presence of something special going on.  With hindsight, it is easy to understand that they knew, full-well, that this was their last tour; that they wanted to go out still proving they had what they always had; and that they were partly rehearsing for what would become the filming for “The Last Waltz”.

I don’t blame Ray Charles for passing on this date, because it didn’t add up. But I’m forever grateful that the other two groups stuck it out – for whatever the reasons – and stayed true to the spirit of the occasion: a memorial, of sorts, to a kindred spirit who’d recently shuffled off this mortal coil; and played their hearts out, as they had in those roadside juke joints [in the case of the early incarnations of The Band], and the countless bars and small theaters with their crude PA’s during the earliest days of Mr. McGuinn and his mates, before they became The Beefeaters, and then The Byrds.

Curious that a couple of people wanted to get into the music promotion game, by throwing together a festival based on the short career of Gram Parsons….. Makes me wonder how prescient they were about his talents, at such an early point in time, or whether they were just trying to hustle their way into the music biz, and using this moment as a launching pad?

By all accounts, the festival was a financial bust, but I’d argue that those who attended got much more than their money’s worth, for the price of admission, on this occasion.

A short blurb on the shows is peeked at, here:

Kentucky Photo Archive – GP Memorial Festival

***

1977

Queen

w/ Thin Lizzy opening

@ Louisville Gardens

Louisville, Kentucky 

[January 21st, 1977]

** A fun account of this show will follow soon…. still trying to figure out who the third act on this night was.

ad-queen-thin-lizzy-1-2-77

 Don’t let the review give the reader the impression that both bands were not impressive; this is by no means a balanced account of what a great show it was!

concert-review-queen-thin-lizzy-1-22-77

***

Jimmy Buffett

w/ Winters Brothers Band opening

@ Bellarmine College

Louisville, Kentucky 

[March 6th, 1977]

Yes, I attended this show, simply because, for a time, I enjoyed Buffett’s first 2 lps and their particular sense of humor… which became a bit tiresome, as the years went by.  Oh, and one of the few times I attended a show, when a “surprise guest” turned up: Dan Fogelberg.  Shame it wasn’t him, headlining, instead, in retrospect, since I listened to his first 3 lps much more, and for a great deal longer.  Read the review ….

Buffett Review - The_Courier_Journal_Mon__Mar_7__1977_

And there’s also this background, before he became so omnipresent in supermarkets and elevators…

Buffett extra The_Courier_Journal_Sun__Apr_3__1977_

***

Little Feat

w/ Steven Bishop opening

@ Memorial Coliseum

Lexington, Kentucky 

[April 16th, 1977]

** A fun account of this show will follow soon….

LIttle Feat & Stephen Bishop - The_Courier_Journal_Sun__Apr_10__1977_

***

Led Zeppelin

@ Freedom Hall, Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center

Louisville, Kentucky 

[April 25th, 1977]

**

See photos from this performance that I took, at the official website for Led Zeppelin:

Led Zeppelin Official Website – April 25, 1977 performance

Note: a recounting of this show, and the story of buying my camera on this date, will appear sometime this year [2016].  In the meantime, you can read a bit about it on the Zep site forums, under “Photos” for this show 😉

***

Jeff Beck Group

w/ Starcastle & UPP opening

@ Louisville Gardens

Louisville, Kentucky 

[July 1st, 1977]

***

Doc & Merle Watson

w/ Mickey Clark opening

@ The Great Midwestern Music Hall

Louisville, Kentucky 

[August 4th, 1977]

 “Where Were You?” Doc & Merle Watson photos & story

***

1978

Patti Smith Group

@ Bogart’s

Cincinnati, Ohio 

[February 16th, 1978]

** A full account and pictures of this show will follow soon…. sometime in 2016!

You can read about the show, and view the pictures, at this link:

Patti Smith Group at Bogart’s, Cincinnati OH [2-16-78]

***

Elvis Costello & the Attractions

two shows!

@ Bogart’s

Cincinnati, Ohio 

[February 20th, 1978]

** A fun account of this show will follow soon…. still trying to figure out who opened on this night.

 ***

Roger McGuinn & Gene Clark

w/ ?? opening

@ Bogart’s

Cincinnati, Ohio 

[April 14th, 1978]

“Where Were You?” Roger McGuinn & Gene Clark photos & story

***

Patti Smith Group

w/ Be-Bop Deluxe opening

@ Louisville Memorial Auditorium

Louisville, Kentucky 

[April 26th, 1978]

** A full account and pictures of this show will follow soon…. sometime in 2016!

You can read about the show, and view the pictures, at this link:

 The Patti Smith Group – Louisville Memorial Auditorium, in Louisville, KY [April 26, 1978]

***

1979

The Kinks

w/ John Cougar & the Zone

 opening

@ The Music Hall

Cincinnati, Ohio

[September 19th, 1979]

** A fun account of this show will follow soon…. This was the first time for me to see what is my favorite band to emerge from the British Invasion! 

***

1980

The Pretenders

w/ Rodney Crowell [scheduled]

opening

@ Louisville Memorial Auditorium

Louisville, Kentucky 

[September 4th, 1980]

You can read about the show, and view the pictures, at this link:

The Pretenders, at Louisville Memorial Auditorium, Louisville Kentucky [September 4, 1980] “The Preface”

***

The Kinks

w/ John Cougar & the Zone

 opening

@ Louisville Gardens

Louisville, Kentucky

[September 10th, 1980]

** A full account and pictures of this show will follow soon…. sometime in 2016! 

***

1981

(or, “The Year of Concerts”)

The Pretenders w/ Rodney Crowell opening

@ Tennessee Theatre

Nashville, Tennessee

[August 16th, 1981]

***NOTE:  My photos and one chapter of the story of ’81 will follow shortly, in 2017

The Pretenders w/ The Bureau? opening

@ The Aragon Theatre

Chicago, Illinois

[August 22nd, 1981]

***NOTE:  My photos and one chapter of the story of ’81 will follow shortly, in 2017

 ***

The Kinks 

w/ Red Rider opening

@ Millet Hall, Miami University of Ohio

Oxford, Ohio 

[September 19th, 1981]

This show I will come back to report on, a bit later, as it is part of a lengthier story which took place during this part of that special year of 1981…

the-kinks-are-coming-uc-miami-9-1-81

***

The Pretenders w/ The Bureau opening

@ Graham Chapel 

Washington University in St. Louis

St. Louis, Missouri

[September 22nd, 1981]

ad-pretenders-washington-9-17-81

***NOTE:  One chapter of the story of ’81 will follow shortly, in 2017

The Pretenders w/ The Bureau? opening

@ Mershon Hall, Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio

[September 25th, 1981]

***NOTE:  Another chapter of the story of ’81 will follow shortly, in 2017

date: 9/25/81
place: Mershon Auditorium, Columbus
warmup: The Bureau
Set List:

The Wait

The Adultress

Message Of Love

Louie, Louie

Talk Of The Town

Kid

Private Life

Stop Your Sobbing

Day After Day

Bad Boys Get Spanked

Tattooed Love Boys

Up The Neck

Precious

— ENCORE —
Brass In Pocket
Mystery Achievement

— ENCORE —
What You Gonna Do About It

***

The Pretenders w/ The Bureau opening

@ Stanley Theatre

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

[September 26th, 1981]

***NOTE:  My photos and one chapter of the story of ’81 will follow shortly, in 2017

ad-pretenders-stanley-the_pittsburgh_press_sun__aug_30__1981_

ad-pretenders-9-24-81

 ***

The Rolling Stones 

@ Freedom Hall, Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center

Louisville, Kentucky 

[November 3rd, 1981]

**See my photos and story on my other blog page, “Where Were You?”:

“Where Were You?”: The Rolling Stones 1981 ‘Kentucky Tour’

***

Tom Verlaine 

@ Bogart’s

Cincinnati, Ohio 

[November 4th, 1981]

**Photographs taken by me on this date will appear sometime soon [2017] on my primary blog, “Where Were You?”

The Rolling Stones 

@ Rupp Arena

Lexington, Kentucky 

[December 11th, 1981]

**See my photos and story on my other blog page, “Where Were You?”:

“Where Were You?”: The Rolling Stones 1981 ‘Kentucky Tour’

***

1982

The Kinks

w/ ?? opening

@ The Palace

Louisville, Kentucky 

[January 18th, 1982]

**Show was cancelled due to a musician’s union local strike – Rescheduled**

***

J. Geils

w/  U2 opening

@ Louisville Gardens

Louisville, Kentucky 

[March 13th, 1982]

 ***

The Police

w/  Joan Jett & the Blackhearts opening

@ Rupp Arena

Lexington, Kentucky 

[April 4th, 1982]

**See my photos and story on my other blog page, “Where Were You?”:

The Police at Rupp Arena – Lexington, Kentucky [April 4, 1982]

 ***

The Kinks

w/ The Producers opening

@ The Palace

Louisville, Kentucky 

[June 15th, 1982]

**NOTE:  Photos of both groups and a story will appear on my other blog page, sometime soon [2017]

The Modernheirs

w/  The N opening

@ Tewligan’s

Louisville, Kentucky

[June 26th, 1982]

***NOTE:  Photos of both bands will appear on my other blog page, sometime in 2017

***

Get Smart [from Kansas]

@ Tewligan’s

Louisville, Kentucky

[June 27th, 1982]

***

Jil Thorp & the Beat Boys

@ Tewligan’s

Louisville, Kentucky 

[July 3rd, 1982]

***

Swiss Park Sun Splash & New Music Festival 

[various artists]:

Babylon Dance Band, Jil Thorp & the Beat Boys,

The N, Nervous Melvin & the Mistakes,

The Modernheirs, Trainable, and The Erector Set

@ Swiss Park 

Louisville, Kentucky

[August 7th, 1982]

Go directly to this link for the photos and report on The Babylon Dance Band portion of the day:

 Babylon Dance Band – Swiss Park, Louisville KY on August 7, 1982

***

Sheena Easton

[The things we do for love….]

@ Louisville Gardens

Louisville, Kentucky 

[August 25th, 1982]

***

Richard Thompson [solo]

two shows

@ The Second Story

Bloomington, Indiana 

[October 13th, 1982]

NOTE: a brief story will appear here, sometime soon [2017]

***

Skull of Glee

w/ Poor Girls* opening

@ The Beat

Louisville, Kentucky 

[October 31st, 1982]

***

On this occasion, I was a participant-rather than only an observer at a performance – as a member of the original line-up of Poor Girls on this date. Story will follow sometime in the near future….

 Poor Girls* 

@ Tewligan’s

Louisville, Kentucky 

[November 11th, 1982]

NOTE:  This would be my second, and final show performing with the band, in a club setting, anyway.  Cannot remember if we headlined, or not, and who else shared the bill.  I hope to clarify that sometime soon [2016]

***

1984

Duran Duran

w/ ?? opening

@ Oakland Coliseum Arena

Oakland, California 

[April 13th, 1984]

 ***

Jeff Berlin’s  Vox Humana

w/ ?? opening

@ Keystone Berkeley

Berkeley, California 

[April 24th, 1984]

***

King Crimson

w/ ?? opening

@ Greek Theatre

Berkeley, California 

[June 2nd, 1984]

***

***

1985

Robyn Hitchcock & the Egyptians

w/ Yo! opening

@ The Berkeley Square

Berkeley, California 

[June 26th, 1985]

photos to appear sometime in the near future

***

The Kinks

w/ Cock Robin opening

@ Concord Pavillion

Concord, California 

[August 23rd, 1985]

***

1986

Scraping Foetus Off the Wheel

w/ Negativland opening

@ The I-Beam

San Francisco, California 

[March 10th, 1986]

“Where Were You?” Foetus photos & story

***

The Fall

w/??? opening

@ The Stone

San Francisco, California 

[March 14th, 1986]

“Where Were You?” The Fall photos & story

***

The Golden Palominos

w/ Eddie Ray Porter opening

@ The I-Beam

San Francisco, California 

[March 24th, 1986]

photos to come sometime in the near future

***

Amnesty International “Conspiracy of Hope”Concert

U2, Peter Gabriel, Sting, The Neville Brothers, Lou Reed, Joan Baez, Jackson Browne, Bryan Adams

**My photographs from this concert cannot be displayed, due to an agreement with Amnesty International, made at the time, which stated that only the publication that the images were taken on behalf of, could publish them**

@ The Cow Palace

San Francisco, California 

[June 4th, 1986]

***

Einsturdzende Neubauten

w/ ??? opening

@ Club DV8

San Francisco, California

[June 6th, 1986]

 **NOTE:  Photos and a story will appear on my other blog page, sometime soon [2017]

***

Rank and File

w/ ??? opening

@ Tewligan’s

Louisville, Kentucky 

[July 30th, 1986]

***

The Fall

w/??? opening

@ The I-Beam

San Francisco, California 

[October 20th & 21st, 1986]

“Where Were You?” The Fall photos and story

***

1987

***

***

1988

The Kinks

w/ Tonio K opening

@ Berkeley Community Theatre

Berkeley, California 

[April 19, 1988]

***NOTE: This would be the last time I’d get to see my fave 60s band, since they could never mount a West Coast Tour again, after this point in time.  I have a special account of this performance to share, sometime soon, in 2017.

***

1989

Swamp Zombies

 w/ The Big Huge* opening

@ Berkeley Square

Berkeley, California 

[March 8th, 1989]

***

On this occasion, I was a participant-rather than only an observer at a performance – as a member of THE BIG HUGE on this date. Story will follow sometime in the near future….

The Go-Betweens

w/ ?? opening

@ The Berkeley Square

Berkeley, California 

[March 15th, 1989]

***

Sordid Humor

w/ ?? opening

@ The Starry Plough

Oakland, California 

[March 16th, 1989]

***

The Sneetches

w/ The Plagiarists? opening

@ Lisa Albright’s 

Berkeley, California 

[April 1st, 1989]

***

Thin White Rope

w/ The Muskrats opening

@ The Kennel Club

San Francisco, California 

[April 4th, 1989]

***

1990

The Sneetches

w/  ?? opening

@ The Starry Plough

Oakland, California 

[February 2nd, 1990]

***

The Sneetches

  Alias Records listening party

@ The Albion

San Francisco, California 

[February 15th, 1990]

***

Richard Thompson

  w/ ?? opening

@ Slim’s

San Francisco, California 

[February 19th, 1990]

***

Henry Kaiser

  in-store appearance

@ Asta’s Records

Oakland, California 

[March 3rd, 1990]

***

The Sneetches

  w/ Sordid Humor opening

@ The Starry Plough

Oakland, California 

[March 3rd, 1990]

***

French, Frith, Kaiser & Thompson

  w/?? opening

@ The Ashkenaz

Berkeley, California 

[March 18th, 1990]

**NOTE:  Photos and a story will appear on my other blog page, sometime soon [2017]

***

The Big Huge*

@ LaVal’s Subterranean

Berkeley, California 

[May 4th, 1990]

On this occasion, I was a participant-rather than only an observer at a performance – as a member of THE BIG HUGE on this date. Story will follow sometime in the near future….

***

1991

***

1992

PJ Harvey

  w/?? opening

@ Slim’s

San Francisco, California 

[August 16th, 1992]

***

The Big Huge*

  w/ Gizzard, Pony Ride & Team Sheep co-billed

@ The Blue Lamp

San Francisco, California 

[September 15th, 1992]

On this occasion, I was a participant-rather than only an observer at a performance – as a member of the THE BIG HUGE on this date. Story will follow sometime in the near future….

***

1993

***

1994

James

  w/ Texas [co-billed]

@ Marriott Hotel Conference Center

San Francisco, California 

[March 26th, 1994]

***

Richard Thompson

  w/ Sam Phillips opening

@ The Warfield

San Francisco, California 

[March 28th, 1994]

***

Boredoms

  w/?? opening

@ Slim’s

San Francisco, California 

[June 26th, 1994]

***

Boredoms

  w/?? opening

@ The Kennel Club

San Francisco, California 

[March 27th, 1994]

***

Any help on confirming some of these dates would be most appreciated!

to be continued…..

 

5 responses to ““Where Was I?” I was here, on these dates: [ongoing]

  1. Pingback: Roger McGuinn & Gene Clark at Bogart’s, Cincinnati OH [April 15, 1978] | michaelconen "where were you?"·

  2. Pingback: Frank Zappa at Louisville Gardens, Louisville KY [11-10-77] | michaelconen "where were you?"·

  3. Pingback: Babylon Dance Band – Swiss Park, Louisville KY on August 7, 1982 | michaelconen "where were you?"·

  4. Pingback: The Pretenders, at Louisville Memorial Auditorium, Louisville Kentucky [September 4, 1980] “The Preface” | michaelconen "where were you?"·

  5. Pingback: This is the place to view some of my concert photos, and to start: Mekons | michaelconen "where were you?"·

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